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Extensive Increase in the Number of U.S. Counties With Mosquitoes That Can Spread Zika Virus

The Southern United States shows an extensive increase in the number of counties that reported evidence of the mosquitoes that can spread dengue, chikungunya, and Zika viruses, according to new research by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

spread of mosquitoes

Mosquito Surveys Show Increase

In the spring and fall of 2016, the CDC conducted surveys to record where Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti mosquitoes were found.

The latest 2016 data add Aedes aegypti collection records from 38 new counties and Aedes albopictus collection records from 127 new counties,

This is a 21 percent and 10 percent increase, compared with the previous report — in the number of counties that report the presence of these mosquitoes.

Map of Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes  

map of mosquitoes january 1995      

Maps showing the reported occurrence of Aedes aegypti by county between January 1, 1995 and December 2016 in the United States.  This map represents the best data of the current distribution of this mosquito based on collection records.

The U.S. counties with black dots had new surveillance records in this update. In addition, counties shown in white had no reported Aedes aegypti presence records within the specified time period.

The counties shown in yellow had Aedes aegypti presence records for one year within the specified time period.  Orange indicates those that had two years of presence records within the specified time period.  And those shown in red had three or more years of presence records within the specified time period.

Map of Aedes albopictus Mosquitoesmap of mosquitoes december 2016

Maps showing the reported occurrence of Aedes albopictus by county between January 1, 1995 and December 2016 in the United States.  This map represents the best information of the current distribution of this mosquito based on collection records.

The counties with black dots had new surveillance records in this update. And counties shown in white had no reported Aedes albopictus presence records within the specified time period.

The counties shown in yellow had Aedes albopictus presence records for one year within the specified time period.  Again, orange indicates those that had two years of presence records within the specified time period.  And those shown in red had three or more years of presence records within the specified time period.

These findings put emphasis on the need for improved and continued mosquito surveillance. Mosquito control districts and state and local health departments can use this information to plan for mosquito control and prevention activities in advance of possible outbreaks of mosquito-borne diseases.

This new report titled, “Updated Reported Distribution of Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti and Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) in the United States, 1995–2016,” is published in the Journal of Medical Entomology.

For more information: www.cdc.gov/zika.


Featured image courtesy of of Jesse Krause.


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