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Protection from Swine Flu

H1N1Protection from swine flu is at the forefront of the public and global health community concerns.

Swine flu is an influenza virus commonly referred to as H1N1.  It was first detected in the United States in April of 2009.

It is very contagious and spreads from person-to-person like many other viruses.

The World Health Organization declared the H1N1 flu as a pandemic, in June 2009; however, the threat still exists. 

Pandemic is a Greek world and is defined as an infectious disease or epidemic that spreads across large regions through human populations; from continent-to-continent or worldwide.

This virus is called the “swine flu” because researchers found that the genes from the virus are similar to those in North American pigs, or swine.

Swine Flu Symptoms

Symptoms of the swine flu include body aches, stuffy or runny nose, fatigue, fever, sore throat, cough, headache, and chills.  Vomiting and diarrhea may also occur in individuals.

People at risk are those who are 65 or older, children 5 years old or younger (especially children younger than 2 years old), and pregnant women.

People who have asthma, heart disease, blood, liver, or kidney disorders, and weakened immune symptoms are also highly susceptible of getting the swine flu.

Here is a brief video with an overview of 1918 Flu Pandemic:

Protection From Swine Flu

Influenza viruses like the swine flu can remain on doorknobs and books from 2 to 8 hours.

Killing the virus can be accomplished by applying heat: (167-212°F [75-100°C])

Cleaning agents like chlorine, hydrogen-dioxide, alcohols, detergents, soaps, and iodine antiseptics (iodophors) are recommended to clean surface that spread the virus. as well.

Wash Your HandsSurfaces that are most likely to spread the virus are doorknobs, desks, toys, bathroom and kitchen surfaces, and shopping carts.

The germs are spread when a person touches a contaminated object and touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth.  In addition, people can get the virus when an infected person sneezes or coughs and the germs are spread in the air.

Protection from swine flu also entails practicing healthy habits by keeping surfaces clean using house disinfectants, disposing tissues, and washing your hands with soap and water after touching surfaces, tissues and similar waste.

Take the advice of health professionals and protect yourself from the H1N1 virus.

For more information on how to protect you and your family, co-workers, and friends visit the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services‘ website: Flu.gov


12 comments… add one
  • Hi George I like your blog posts and writing style very much. but I do agree with Dennis about swine flue the pharmaceutical companies patented the vaccine for it three years before the first swine flue case. And coincidentally made a fortune for the pharmaceutical companies in the process. They sold it by spreading fear mongering messages through the media. The vaccines contain every poison under the sun. You can see more about it at http://www.weaponofmassdestruction.co.uk .

    Thank you for all you do have a nice weekend George 🙂

    • Thank you, Sotiris.

      I can appreciate your view and opinion on the mistakes made in global health pertaining to the H1N1 vaccine.

      However, the H1N1 virus is still prevalent in parts of the world. In addition, mutation of this strain is possible, as with any other strain of virus.

      There are various outbreaks taking place around the world that effect our health.

      This article gives a bit of history of the pandemic in 1918 and natural ways to protect us from getting viruses.

      In my humble opinion, having the knowledge to prevent getting a disease, as well as knowing how to avoid spreading them is worthwhile.

  • CHOI, Won-Sim

    Hi George,

    I have a habit of washing my hands often and some say I have mysophobia. 🙂

    Anyway I’m rather weak but I haven’t had a cold in ages.

    Thank you for promoting awareness of the dangers of swine flu and awakening to the importance of healthy habits.

    Thanks!

    Choi

    • Thank you as well, Choi!

      It’s great you’re able to keep from getting a cold or flu.

      The same applies to me. I can’t remember the last time I had one.

      You may have noticed, if you Google “swine flu” within the last month you can see the virus is still at large and mutating.

      Thank you for sharing your thoughts and stay well, Choi!

      • CHOI, Won-Sim

        Yes, George

        I found an recent article(on September 10th, 2012) in the ScienceNews that said new swine flu virus could infect people. Unfortunately, it is said that at least one virus isolated from pigs in Korea may already have potential to cause disease in people.

        We should always be careful.

        Many thanks.

        • Yes, Choi. The H1N1 virus has the potential of mutating into a strain we do not have a vaccine for.

          Practicing the safe and healthy habit of washing our hands when exposed to hard surfaces and food, as well as properly covering our mouth when sneezing and coughing are simple ways to protect ourselves from exposure.

          However, it is difficult to protect oneself in big cities or places that are highly populated.

          • CHOI, Won-Sim

            Oh my God!

            I live in a big city, Seoul in Korea.

            ….. at least one virus isolated from pigs in Korea may already have potential to cause disease in people….. 🙂

            Thanks.

  • George,

    That is the biggest bunch of Government inspired horse s#*t I have ever read. Wake up mate, don’t you realize that this is orchestrated by Government to suck people into getting a flu shot which is the most deadly thing that you can do. Do your research go to http://www.infowars.com and research the truth about swine flu and do us all a favor and stop posting this garbage.

    Please do not bother me again,

    Denis

    You need to do your research before acting and becoming part of the Governments propaganda machine.

    • Thank you for your comment, Denis.

      Also, thank you for sharing your link and opinion…

  • Tina Bosela

    George,

    Great Article and video!

    It’s good to know where the swine flu came from and ways you can get it.

    I appreciate that you are making us aware that the swine flu is still here and there are ways we can protect ourselves from getting it.

    Thanks again,

    Tina

    • Thank you as well, Tina.

      I’m glad I could be able to offer additional information pertaining to H1N1 “swine flu.”

      I appreciate you reading and commenting on this article.

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